San Quintín, Baja California: Alliance of National State and Municipal Organizations for Social Justice Communique, March 17, 2015

Source: Pronunciamiento del Proletariado Agricola del Valle de San Quintin en Vispera de un Paro General

TO THE [MEXICAN] STATE AND FEDERAL EXECUTIVE AUTHORITIES.

TO LOCAL AND FEDERAL DEPUTIES.

TO THE SPECIAL COMMISSIONER FOR DIALOGUE

WITH INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

TO THE NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL DEFENDER ORGANIZATIONS OF HUMAN RIGHTS

TO THE NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL MEDIA.

FOR PUBLIC OPINION.

Subject: closure of roads and sit-ins on Tuesday, March 17, 2015 at 8:00am.

San Quintín Baja California March of 2015

ALLIANCE OF NATIONAL, STATE AND MUNICIPAL ORAGANIZATIONS FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE.

Addressed to the People of Baja California and to Popular Opinion.

The farmworkers of the San Quintín Valley and the rest of Baja California, have exhausted all possible means towards coming to a peaceful dialogue to find a solution to the many violations against our labor and human rights, by our employers.

As many of you already know, having lived in the San Quintín valley, an agricultural area where the most of us are permanent workers who stay from one year to 25 years, loyally working for each one of the existing agricultural corporations, we know that the Constitution of the United States of Mexico expressly states that everyone has the right to dignified work that is beneficial to society; to this end, the state will promote the creation of jobs as well as the social organization of the workplace, in the same way it is clear to point out that there are rights and obligations that we have as workers just as our bosses have obligations. But unfortunately the agri-corporations that operate in this region have their own regulations that lead to egregious violations of protected labor rights such as: freedom of association, where we as workers are not allowed to organize together to demand that our rights be respected, because the our bosses or their administrative staff later accuse us of being trouble makers; in the same thread there exists forced labor, because we are obligated to work extra hours and on weekends, because if we do not work we are suspended for three to four days and we are fired without having the right to file claims contesting the disciplinary action as the law has established, or they assign us a certain number of rows that we have to complete in a set amount of time to be able to earn 100.00 one hundred pesos [$6.62 U.S.] and on the other hand we are able to earn between 40.00 forty [$2.65 U.S.] to 60.00 sixty pesos [$3.97 U.S.] minimum wage for a more than eight-hour-long work day; exploitation and poor treatment of people, because certain agri-corporations, they make contracts with the transport carriers so that they can exploit us easier because they make us work extra hours and they pay the drivers well, but at the same time the drivers charge us 30 [$1.99 U.S.] to 40 pesos [$2.65 U.S.] minimum of our daily wages, that means for example that I as a worker ride in the driver’s transport bus which takes me to work in X company, and after working 9 to 10 hours, the company pays the transport driver 145 pesos [$9.60 U.S.] or more on my behalf, but the driver only pays me the worker 100.00 one hundred pesos [$6.62 U.S.]; Discrimination also happens, harassment and violence in some cases it does not come directly from the bosses, but it does happen at the hands of the crew foremen and crop managers, where they abuse their position of power to discriminate and insult us, much of the harassment and violence is directed towards female workers; the wages that we earn as farmworkers is not enough to satisfy the normal everyday needs of a head of household, in regards to material needs, social needs and cultural needs, nor to provide the obligatory educational needs of our children as mandated by the Constitution.

In terms of benefits for example: Vacations Article 77 of the law says that workers who have been employed longer than one year are entitled to enjoy an annual period of paid vacation, which in no case can be less than six work days in length, and which will increase in length by two days, until reaching twelve days, every subsequent year of employment. Many of us have worked permanent positions for more than 20 years and have never enjoyed that right and even less a paid holiday.

The right to a bonus, most of us farmworkers don’t even know what a bonus is, we have also never enjoyed the benefit of profit sharing.

For these reasons, the Alliance of National, State and Municipal Organizations for Social Justice, propose and solicit the following.

  1. The formation of a dialogue board with: the Secretary of the Interior, Miguel Ángel Osorio Chong.
  2. The Grower’s League
  3. The Regional delegate of IMSS [Mexican Social Security Institute]
  4. The Unions, C.T.M. [Confederation of Mexican Workers] and C.R.O.M. [Regional Confederation of Mexican Workers]
  5. The secretary of labor and social welfare, from both levels of government.

Our demands as farmworkers are simple but profound, they are the same demand as always and for years and that nobody wants to resolve, we presented our demands on November 9, 2014 to Juana Laura Pérez Floreano, Esq. Secretary of labor and social welfare of the state, and to Minerva Torres, Esq. the federal delegate of said secretary headquartered in Mexicali, Baja California. Due to the lack of a response to date Sir Governor and because of your lack of ability, and power to convene all of the principal actors.

In regards to this situation we hold you [Governor] directly responsible for todays social escalation.

DEMANDS

 

  1. Revoke the union contract signed by C.T.M. [Confederation of Mexican Workers] and C.R.O.M. [Regional Confederation of Mexican Workers] with the Growers League, on the basis of their grave violations of our labor and human rights.
  1. For the right of seniority to be respected.
  1. For all workers to be registered in the IMSS [Mexican Social Security Institute] from the first day that they earn an income at a company through their labor so that they and their dependents can have access to medical insurance.
  1. That all benefits required by law be paid to farmworkers, including seventh day and holidays.
  1. For overtime to be paid double and triple time.
  1. For the rights of pregant farmworkers to be respected, maternity leave six weeks before and six weeks after birth.
  1. For those men who will be fathers be granted paternity leave for 5 days of paid leave.
  2. No more tolerance of sexual harassment by crew formen, general managers and engineers who run operations on the farms.
  1. No retaliation against farmworkers who are participating directly or indirectly in these actions.
  1. For the state minimum wage to be $300.00 mexican pesos [$19.89 U.S.] per day.
  1. For each box of strawberries be paid at $30.00 mexican pesos [$1.99 U.S.] because since 2001 the piece-rate prices have remained stagnant at $10.00 pesos [$0.66 U.S.] to $12.00 pesos [$0.80 U.S.]. And for Sundays, a holiday be paid double.
  1. For Blackberry jars to be paid at $17.00 Mexican pesos [$1.13 U.S.] per piece, and on Sundays, a holiday be paid double.
  1. For tomato buckets to be paid at $8.00 Mexican pesos [$0.53 U.S.].
  1. In the same way that the rest of what is produced, in Baja California receive a fair wage, for better social conviviality between workers and the boss.

We authorize the Indigenous Front of Binational Organizations to disperse this communique

FOR A BETTER FUTURE

FOR A NEW PATRIMONY

SINCERELY

 

ALLIANCE OF NATIONAL, STATE AND MUNICIPAL ORAGANIZATIONS FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE.

10 thoughts on “San Quintín, Baja California: Alliance of National State and Municipal Organizations for Social Justice Communique, March 17, 2015

  1. I have never seen Sakuma berries! But I must confess to buying Driscolls which seem to have a monopoly on berries at least here in northern Califa! Whaat can we do???

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